1 11, 2014

Beef Liver Curry

By |November 1st, 2014|Beef, Curry, gluten-free, Liver, meat|2 Comments|

I grew up eating liver.  My mum made liver and onions fairly often, probably once a month or so ever since I was little.  I always enjoyed it and never thought once of turning my nose up at it.  I didn’t know kids weren’t supposed to like liver.

Time went on, I met and married Perry and since he also liked liver, I cooked it once in a while and we both enjoyed it.

Fast forward to Krestan being born and me being a far too indulgent mom who only cooked him what he wanted to eat.  Liver wasn’t one of the things he wanted, so I basically stopped cooking it.  I don’t think I realised I’d pretty much removed it from our diets, but that’s what happened.  Occasionally we’d go out for lunch and Perry would order it and I’d think that I really had to make it again soon.  For some reason, that didn’t really happen and we probably ate liver a handful of times over the following 10 years or so.

When Krestan was about 6 or 7 years old, I started to become interested in nutrition and Perry being the person he is (thirsty for knowledge no matter what the subject) also became interested.  We started out trying things like quinoa (in 2001 I think), unhulled grains and such.  Then ventured into more interesting and obscure things such as lucuma, goji berries, raw cacao and the list goes on.  A few years ago we decided to start ordering frozen meat from a local farm where the cows are grass-fed and grass-finished and one of the items available for sale was beef liver.  We included a few pounds of liver in our order and were really excited about trying it.  I cooked it the first time and although it wasn’t terrible, I really didn’t enjoy it as much as I’d remembered.  I figured that time was a fluke and made it again a couple of months later.  Again, I didn’t dislike it, but I also didn’t love it.  This was very frustrating for me because by then I’d learned how incredibly nutritious offal is, especially when it comes from healthy, pastured animals.  Perry still loved it, but I think I’d just become a bit squeamish.  Over the last few years, I’ve made it a few times but really just ate it because I knew it was good for me, not because I was craving the taste.

Last week I decided to do something about this new-found aversion to liver.  I gave it some thought and it made sense to me that since my favourite cuisine is Indian, perhaps I could combine that with liver and come up with something I’d enjoy a lot more.  I searched online and came up with this recipe which sounded like exactly what I was looking for.  I made it for dinner and much to my delight I absolutely loved it.  I changed a few things and changed the quantities of most of the ingredients.  I opted not to boil the liver cubes first as I figured that might leach out some of the nutrients.

Here’s what I did…

 

I coarsely chopped 2 large onions and sautéed in virgin coconut oil with 1 tsp. of garam masala.

I coarsely chopped 2 large onions and sautéed in virgin coconut oil with 1 tsp. of garam masala.

 

I chopped 5 cloves of garlic and a 3" piece of ginger. I measured out 5 cloves, 1 tbsp. cumin seeds a cinnamon stick and 1 bay leaf.

I chopped 5 cloves of garlic and a 3″ piece of ginger. I measured out 5 cloves, 1 tbsp. cumin seeds a cinnamon stick and 1 bay leaf.

 

I added this to the pan with the onions.

I added this to the pan with the onions.

 

 

 

And then decided to add 4 green cardamom pods.

And then decided to add 5 green cardamom pods.

 

I stirred it and added 1/2 cup of water, continuing to cook over medium heat.

I stirred it and added 1/2 cup of water, continuing to cook over medium heat.

 

 

 

I cooked it until the water had evaporated and it looked like this.

I cooked it until the water had evaporated and it looked like this.

 

Then I added 3 chopped tomatoes.

Then I added 3 chopped tomatoes.

 

I added 1 tsp. salt, 1 tbsp. ground coriander, 1 tsp. cayenne, 1 tbsp. turmeric and 1 minced Thai bird chile.

I added 1 tsp. Himalayan salt, 1 tbsp. ground coriander, 1 tsp. cayenne and 1 tbsp. turmeric.

 

I stirred it all together and cooked until the tomatoes became soft.

I stirred it all together and cooked until the tomatoes became soft.

 

Then I cubed the liver into bite-sized pieces.

Then I cubed the liver into bite-sized pieces.

 

I added the liver to the pan.

I added the liver to the pan.

 

And also added 2 minced Thai bird chiles and 1/2 bunch of chopped cilantro.

And also added 2 minced Thai bird chiles and 1/2 bunch of chopped cilantro.  Stirred it all together and cooked for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally until the liver was done (still very slightly pink inside).

 

Although we almost never eat grains of any sort, I decided I wanted a little bit of basmati rice with this.  It was the perfect accompaniment.

Although we almost never eat grains of any sort, I decided I wanted a little bit of basmati rice (about 1/4 cup) with this. It was the perfect accompaniment.

 

Beef Liver Curry

 

  • 1/4 cup virgin coconut oil
  • 1 tsp. garam masala
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3″ piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 tsp. cumin seeds
  • 5 green cardamom pods
  • 3 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tsp. Himalayan salt
  • 1 tbsp. coriander powder
  • 1 tsp. cayenne
  • 1 tbsp. turmeric powder
  • 1lb beef liver, chopped into bite-sized pieces
  • two minced Thai bird chiles
  • 1/2 bunch chopped fresh cilantro
  1. In a large saucepan, sauté chopped onion and garam masala in virgin coconut oil.
  2. Add water, garlic, ginger, bay leaf, cinnamon stick, cloves and cumin seeds and cook until water is evaporated.
  3. Add tomatoes, salt, coriander, cayenne and turmeric and continue to cook until tomatoes are soft.
  4. Add liver, cilantro and Thai bird chiles and cook until liver is done (about 5 minutes), stirring occasionally.
  5. Serve with cooked basmati rice, roti or over cauliflower rice if you don’t eat grains.
7 11, 2009

Downtown Toronto lunch

By |November 7th, 2009|ethiopian, injera, meat, recipe, Uncategorized, vietnamese|0 Comments|

Perry and I spent this afternoon in downtown Toronto.  We had lunch at our favourite Vietnamese restaurant “Pho Pasteur”, walked around St. Lawrence market and had some wonderful mochaccinos at a coffee shop in Kensington market.  Just before leaving for home, we decided to buy some injera from an Ethiopian store.  I haven’t made Ethiopian food for a long time, so tonight’s dinner was a lot of fun.  I made two dishes, Doro Wat (chicken stew) and Mesir Wat (red lentil stew).  I felt like I wanted something green to accompany the lentils and chicken, so I threw some kale from our garden into the Doro Wat.
I’m afraid the pics. aren’t great as they’re from my phone.

The injera (one right side up, one upside down)

The Mesir Wat

The Doro Wat

Me standing by the bears in the Sculpture Garden http://www.torontosculpturegarden.com/
6 11, 2009

Pork Roasted in a Baguette

By |November 6th, 2009|baguette, meat, pork, recipe, roast, Uncategorized|0 Comments|

I found this recipe online and made it for dinner a few months ago. I loved it so much that I made it two nights in a row!  I have since tweaked the recipe and it’s even better.  YUMMY!!!

Pork Roasted in a Baguette

4 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon each of freshly chopped sage and rosemary
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 cloves garlic, minced
Celtic sea salt
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 small pork tenderloins
2 whole grain baguette rolls (try to match the length of the pork tenderloins with the length of the baguette rolls)

Finely chop the sage, rosemary and garlic.  Put them on a plate and add about 1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt and the freshly ground black pepper.  Mix well.

Heat a cast iron skillet over fairly high heat. Add a little of the oil. Sear the pork on all sides. Cover each tenderloin with 2 tablespoons of the mustard.  Roll the pork in the garlic and herb mixture. Cut the baguette rolls in half lengthwise and scoop out most of the doughy insides. Brush the inside of the baguettes with the rest of the oil. Fit the tenderloins inside of the baguette rolls so that only a little of the top is visible. Tie the baguettes with some kitchen string.

Preheat an oven to 375°F. Place the pork on a baking sheet and roast until done (about 20 to 25 minutes).

Allow the meat to rest for about 10 minutes.

Serves 2-4 (depending on how hungry you are!)